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Research finds dry rivers a 'major driver' of climate change

Dry rivers such as those that wind across Canterbury could be a significant contributor to global warming, researchers have discovered.sFor the first time scientists have analysed the amount of carbon dioxide that enters the atmosphere when plant material in dry riverbeds becomes wet when waters return.

Major overhaul to Michigan's drinking water rules scheduled to take effect in June

Half a million lead water pipes would have to be replaced in Michigan under the new drinking water rules scheduled to take effect in June. The project is expected to cost $2.5 billion.

National parks could face flooding from sea level rise, storm surge

The National Park Service has released its first-ever report on how the impact of sea level rise and flooding from storms could impact national parks around the country.sMore than a quarter of the property managed by the park system is on a coast, according to the report, and many face increasing threats from rising sea levels connected to global warming and increased threats of flooding from storms in the coming decades.

Global Fish Catch Could Plummet as Climate Change Takes Hold

Over the next two centuries, warming oceans could trap nutrients at the poles and starve out many of the world’s fisheries, according to a recent study.

This water filter made of paper could save people’s lives during natural disasters

Researchers from the University of Buffalo invented a nearly 100 percent efficient, low-cost water filter powered by the sun.

New tool illustrates where Atlanta’s ‘park deserts’ are most severe

Despite its famed canopy, abundance of natural greenery, and celebrated public spaces such as Piedmont and Grant parks, Atlanta has consistently ranked middle-of-the-pack among major cities when it comes to overall park hierarchy.

Plastic taints most bottled water, study finds

After testing more than 250 bottles of water from nine countries including China, USA, Brazil, India, Indonesia, Lebanon, Mexico, Thailand, and Germany, researchers from State University of New York found tiny pieces of plastic in the water in 93 out of every 100 of the bottles. Effects on human health are unknown at this time.

Thousands to March for the Ocean and Clean Water for All

After the March for Science and Earth Day, comes the March for the Ocean on June 9, to continue the fight to stop offshore oil drilling, end plastic pollution and protect our coastlines. On World Oceans Day weekend (June 9), thousands are expected to come to DC to participate in a flotilla on the Potomac and Anacostia Rivers, a march past the White House, and a rally, along with simultaneous events across the US and around the world.

Nat Geo's 'Planet or Plastic?' Initiative Latest Attempt to Save the Oceans from Plastic

As the amount of single-use plastic in the world's oceans continues to grow, National Geographic is announcing a new, global commitment to tackle this pressing problem. On Wednesday, the media giant launched Planet or Plastic?, a multiyear initiative aimed at raising awareness of this challenge and reducing the amount of single-use plastic that enters the world's oceans.

To defeat superbugs, everyone will need access to clean water

The global use of antibiotics is growing, driven by a number of developing countries that face more antibiotic-resistant infections. University of Oxford’s Abhilasha Karkey explains the link between antibiotic use and having access to clean water.

‘Dead zone’ larger than Scotland found by underwater robots in Arabian sea

An underwater “dead zone” larger than the area of Scotland has been discovered by robots exploring the Arabian Sea.sScientists say the situation is “worse than feared” after finding almost no oxygen in the Gulf of Oman, the strait that connects the Arabian Sea to the Strait of Hormuz in the Middle East.

How Parks Support More Active and Equitable Communities

As the health benefits of nature are becoming more widely recognized, it’s important to identify gaps in access to parks and green spaces. The American Society of Landscape Architects has highlighted disparities in Los Angeles, noting that 3.8 million residents of the city are too far from “a park to use one easily, conveniently, or frequently.”

Dina Leech column: Fresh water: help restore this precious resource

The irony of our “blue planet” is that most water on Earth is unusable to humanity. Fresh water — which is essential for life and needed for agriculture, industry, and society — makes up less than 3 percent of the total water on Earth; and only 0.03 percent is easily accessible in lakes, rivers, and swamps. As the human population continues to grow, it puts an even greater strain on the amount of fresh water available per person.

Countries With The Most Protected Lands (Percentage Of Area As Reserves)

All over the planet, countries are increasingly working to conserve the wealth and beauty of their natural resources. While some say setting aside nature reserves inhibits economic development, others vehemently contend that doing so is of great import, not only to wildlife and biodiversity, but to the future of the human race as well. Below, we take a look at those countries with the highest relative proportions of their respective land areas being set aside as terrestrial, protected, nature reserves.

Miracle moss removes arsenic from drinking water

While it's not the responsibility of plants to clean up the mess we humans seem to make of the planet, it is certainly kind of them to show us how it's done. The latest plant to offer an assist in environmental clean-up looks to be Warnstofia fluitans, otherwise known as floating hook moss.

Park Rx urges people: Take it outside

Health care providers in Rutland County are prescribing fresh air and sunshine to their patients as part of Park Rx, a health and fitness initiative.

90 COMMUNITIES ACROSS CHICAGOLAND SIGN GREENEST REGION COMPACT TO CREATE SUSTAINABLE FUTURE

The Metropolitan Mayors Caucus announced today that 90 Chicago-area communities of Chicagoland's 275 cities, towns and villages that comprise the Metropolitan Mayors Caucus have signed the Greenest Region Compact (GRC).

Farm Runoff Causing Widespread Drinking Water Pollution in Midwest

A new report from the Environmental Working Group reveals that the U.S. Department of Agriculture is failing to enforce a key farm bill provision, with dire consequences for drinking water in the Midwest.

World Water Day 2018: The answer is in nature

World Water Day, on 22 March every year, is about focusing attention on the importance of water. This year’s theme, ‘Nature for Water’, explores nature-based solutions (NBS) to the water challenges we face in the 21st century.

How burnout drove an entrepreneur to help 30,000 people in Southeast Asia

A new water filtration system is providing clean drinking water to more than 30,000 people in remote villages in Southeast Asia.

The Ocean Cleanup is about to send a giant plastic collector to the Great Pacific Garbage Patch

The Great Pacific Garbage Patch is growing at an alarming rate — and it’s already three times the size of France.

These whales will be extinct in 25 years, scientists say — unless we act now to save them

Scientists say that right whales, already an endangered species, could become extinct in 25 years. There are only 450 of these whales swimming in the world’s oceans, and this past year there were no new calves born.

2.1 billion people lack safe drinking water at home, more than twice as many lack safe sanitation

Some 3 in 10 people worldwide, or 2.1 billion, lack access to safe, readily available water at home, and 6 in 10, or 4.5 billion, lack safely managed sanitation, according to a new report by the World Health Organization (WHO) and UNICEF.

Discover U.S. National Heritage Areas

U.S. National Heritage Areas allow visitors to celebrate our nation’s diverse heritage. There are 49 NHAs in the U.S. that serve as sites where history, culture and nature combine.

Dear leaders: You've failed your children on climate change

Read what a 16-year-old environmental activist has to say about climate change and its impact on the future of our children.

Global Fisheries Will Lose $10B A Year To Climate Change By 2050

Scientists at the University of British Columbia recently revealed that climate change will gut the global fishing industry by $10 billion per year within a few decades.

It's not just the oceans: Microplastic pollution is all around us

In the past few years, scientists have found microplastics in our soil, tap water, bottled water, beer and even in the air we breathe. And there's growing concern about the potential health risks they pose to humans.

Cotton buds and plastic straws could be banned in England next year

Cotton buds, plastic drinking straws and other single-use plastics could be banned from sale in England next year in the next phase of the campaign to try to halt the pollution of the world’s rivers and oceans.

65 Pounds of Plastic Trash Tore This Whale Apart from the Inside

During a recent necropsy, investigators discovered nearly 65 lbs. (29 kilograms) of plastic trash crammed into the dead whale's stomach and intestines, including dozens of plastic bags, chunks of mangled rope and glass.

Future "Ocean Cities" Need Green Engineering Above and Below the Waterline

Population growth has seen skylines creep ever higher and entire cities rise from ocean depths. The latest “ocean city” is the Chinese-developed Forest City project. By 2045, four artificial islands in Malaysia will cover 14sq kilometres of ocean (an area larger than 10,000 Olympic swimming pools), and support 700,000 residents.

The world's deepest garbage dump: Carrier bag is found 36,000 feet below the surface of the Pacific, in the world's deepest ocean trench . . . and it's not alone

Plastic pollution is invading the deepest parts of the ocean, causing damage to the ecosystem that can last thousands of years. The discovery of a plastic bag 36,000 feet below the surface of the Pacific Ocean in the Mariana Trench is of global concern.

How NASA, Lasers And New Technology Help Measure California’s Snowpack With Exceptional Accuracy

New laser technology from NASA can now measure snowpack from the Sierra more accurately leading to better water conservation management in California.

How a Solar Microgrid Is Helping an Indigenous California Tribe Achieve Community Resiliency

The Chemehuevi Tribe is using a solar #microgrid to provide clean and affordable energy to power its community center in the Mojave Desert. Solar power can benefit underserved communities in other remote locations. In fact, California is committing $44 million to additional mcrogrid projects in 2018.

A 'floating fillet': Rice farmers grow bugs to replenish California's salmon

Rice paddy farmers are cultivating water fleas for salmon food near the #Sacramento River to help replenish dwindling populations of the popular fish.

With sea level rise, a major California ecosystem faces extinction if we don’t act

It is increasingly clear that climate change will touch every corner of California. For the state’s coastal marshes – a major ecosystem from San Diego to Humboldt counties – the toll may be complete annihilation.

Microplastic pollution in oceans is far worse than feared, say scientists

A study reveals highest microplastic pollution levels ever recorded in a river in Manchester, UK and shows that billions of particles flooded into the sea from rivers in the area in just one year.

Fleet of sailboat drones could monitor climate change’s effect on oceans

Sailboat drones powered by wind and sun have been collecting data in the Pacific Ocean about temperature and currents. Additionally, they collect information on wind and solar radiation. Among other findings, these data show how the ocean and air exchange gases such as carbon dioxide and oxygen which could help explain why the tropical Pacific emits carbon dioxide, rather than absorbing it like the rest of the ocean.

Volunteers install 70 plants in ongoing project to restore Brand Park trail

More than 40 volunteers planted about 70 drought resistant plants as part of an ongoing project by the Glendale Parks and Open Space Foundation and the Glendale community services and parks department to improve a neglected park trail near the Brand Library. (Courtesy of Marc Stirdivant)

In a First, California Moves to Protect People from Toxic PFAS Chemicals in Carpets

Carpets and rugssare a major source of potentially toxic chemicals and can be especially harmful to children. They cover more than half of all U.S. homes and workplaces. California’s Safer Consumer Products program wants to identify sources of toxicity in consumer products and find alternatives.

Will the world come together to end ocean plastic pollution? It depends

The global community has solved significant environment problems, such as the ozone hole, but has fallen far short on others.

Why Mexico’s massive new marine reserve is a model for ocean protection

The Revillagigedo Archipelago National Park puts 57,176 square miles of the Pacific Ocean off limits to commercial fishing – and comes with funding to enforce the ban.

The U.K. has banned microbeads. Why?

They’re tiny, colorful and harmless-looking, but these little pellets are being blamed for causing big problems for the world’s oceans and seas.

Scientists find surprising evidence of rapid changes in the Arctic

Scientists have found surprising evidence of rapid climate change in the Arctic: In the middle of the Arctic Ocean near the North Pole, they discovered that the levels of radium-228 have almost doubled over the last decade.

A deep dive into the year in oceans 2017

The ocean may cover more than 70 percent of the planet, but it doesn’t get covered nearly enough in the news.

The best countries to escape the worst effects of climate change

While the US ranked among the top 10 countries most likely to survive climate change in 2015, it slipped to 12th place this year.

Deeply Talks: Why plastic straws are key to fighting ocean pollution

Oceans Deeply talks with experts about how the city of Seattle pioneered a ban on plastic straws.

Scotland plans to ban plastic straws by end of 2019

Scottish Environment Secretary says she would like to see more single-use plastics banned as a means of tackling marine pollution.

In a fight for much-needed green spaces, these Latino advocates bring a winning formula

Green spaces and parks have been linked to a multitude of positive outcomes including better health, less stress and stronger communities. But in neighborhoods where these places aren't available or easily accessible, residents aren't able to enjoy these benefits.

NOTABLE CITIES/COUNTIES WITH PLASTIC BAG BANS AND FEES

In 2014 California became the first state to enact legislation banning single use plastic bags at large retail stores. Some U.S. counties and cities now ban or charge fees for plastic bags to reduce their harmful impact to the environment. Check the link to see what places are on the path to a #HealthyWorldForAll and visit our website for the latest news.

Climate Friendly Parks Program

Our national parks are especially susceptible to the effects of #ClimateChange. That’s why the National Park Service which has established the Climate Friendly Parks (CFP) Program. Learn how more than 120 National Parks plan to respond to Climate Change issues such as sea level rise in the Everglades and the shrinking range of the Joshua Tree.

STRAWLESS OCEAN

We use 500 Million Plastic Straws Every Day in the U.S.sMany of those plastic straws end up in our oceans, polluting the water and harming sea life. If we don’t act now, by 2050 there will be more plastic in the ocean than fish.

Economic benefits of green spaces

According to a research report by the Forestry Commission, a non-ministerial government department responsible for forestry in England and Scotland, evidence exists that investments in green space have a positive impact on constituent components such as job creation, new business start-ups and private investment.sRead more at https://www.thestar.com.my/business/business-news/2017/06/17/economic-benefits-of-green-spaces/#42mkspoIKFJg54yU.99

Sea level rise accelerating: acceleration in 25-year satellite sea level record

Global sea level rise is not cruising along at a steady 3 mm per year, it's accelerating a little every year, like a driver merging onto a highway, according to a powerful new assessment led by CIRES Fellow Steve Nerem.

Safe Drinking Water for Californian

Most of us take for granted our ability to turn on the tap and drink the water that flows from it. More than 1 million Californians, however, cannot take this basic human right for granted. Their water is not safe to drink and, in some cases, may not be safe for any household use. Instead they have to spend thousands of dollars a year on bottled water—dollars that residents of the impoverished communities most impacted by this problem don’t likely have. Flint, Michigan may have brought a national spotlight to water issues, but many low-income families have been living with the lack of safe water for years.

Plastic waste 'building up' in Arctic

Plastic waste is building up in the supposedly pristine wilderness of the Norwegian Arctic, scientists say. Researchers are particularly concerned about huge concentrations of microplastic fragments in sea ice.

Mass Die-Off of Farmed Salmon Linked to Climate Change

Scientists have attributed an algal bloom that killed off $800 million worth of salmon in Chile to rising ocean temperatures, and they say other aquaculture operations around the world are at risk.

March for the Ocean Set for June 9, 2018

On Saturday June 9, 2018, World Oceans Day weekend and the beginning of the 2018 hurricane season, the March for the Ocean (M4O) campaign will mount mass marches, flotillas and rallies in our nation’s capital and around the country.

California lawmakers are stuck on Trump, but there's a problem at home that needs attention: dirty water

While President Trump and his California resistors dominate the spotlight, a little outfit without much pizazz is trying to draw state government’s attention to sickening drinking water in the San Joaquin Valley.

American drinking water could soon get a lot dirtier

The Trump administration's new infrastructure plan aims to ease regulatory checks on US waterways. The administration says this will help fast-track more building projects and reduce permit delays. But some water experts are worried that it could put some of the country's most fragile drinking water systems at risk, and put the expensive burden of water cleanup onto cities.

Heart-breaking moment mother turtle is forced to lay eggs on a huge pile of rubbish at a filthy beach

This is the shocking moment a mother turtle struggled to nest on a beach filled with rubbish and marine debris.

Great Barrier Reef: rising temperatures turning green sea turtles female

Rising temperatures are turning almost all green sea turtles in a Great Barrier Reef population female, new research has found.

We just discovered these places (national parks;) now you want to take them from us?

National Park Service plans to double fees at some of the most spectacular parks around the country.

Oceans suffocating as huge dead zones quadruple since 1950, scientists warn

Areas starved of oxygen in open ocean and by coasts have soared in recent decades, risking dire consequences for marine life and humanity.

These are the countries where air pollution is the deadliest

These are the 10 countries with the highest mortality rates (per 100,000 people) associated with air pollution in 2016.

Entry fees could double at some national parks

The park service said that the increase in funds would be used to address maintenance issues that affect the visitor experience, such as roads, campgrounds and bathrooms.

The most accurate climate change models predict the most alarming consequences, study finds

The climate change simulations that best capture current planetary conditions are also the ones that predict the most dire levels of human-driven warming.

Mysterious disease wastes South Florida's corals, and scientists are racing to find a cure

Called white plague, white blotch and other names, depending on the pattern of damaged or destroyed tissue, the disease has infected more than 20 South Florida coral species from the mid-Florida Keys through Palm Beach County.

Seven charts that explain the plastic pollution problem

Marine life is facing "irreparable damage" from the millions of tons of plastic waste which ends up in the oceans each year, the United Nations has warned.

When climate change becomes a credit problem

Climate change is now a credit issue for city and state governments vulnerable to extreme weather events and natural disasters made worse by global warming.

Silicon Valley wants to solve our water problems

Despite a lack of VC funds, there’s a steady flow of entrepreneurs. The entrepreneur started investing in water tech startups a few years ago. A small fraction of venture capital dollars currently goes into tech to manage or clean water.

Humans have dumped tons of plastic into oceans. Now it’s reached the deepest depths, study finds

Most of that plastic isn’t recycled. 91 percent of the world’s plastic ends up as waste that threatens fish, birds, mammals and even the crustaceans seven miles below the ocean’s surface.

Lobster's Pepsi 'tattoo' highlights major ocean problem

A lobster fished from waters off the coast of New Brunswick, Canada, was found earlier this month with an unusual marking on its claw—what appears to be the image of a Pepsi can.

Here's how cities can get the most out of their parks

A neighborhood park can be a powerful tool to help nearby residents lead healthier lives. According to one study, every dollar spent on creating and maintaining park trails saves nearly $3 in healthcare expenses.

L.A. parks get their report cards — and the bathrooms get a C

Sixteen parks got D or F grades for their bathrooms, which got an overall C grade across the city. And dirtiness and safety were also a worry beyond the restroom doors, in the face of surging homelessness and a strained budget for the parks department.

Island nations, with no time to lose, take climate response into their own hands

Small islands also are among the smallest contributors to climate change, producing less than 1 percent of global greenhouse gas emissions.